Neoclassical splendour around Regent’s Park

June 10, 2007 at 6:24 am | Posted in Architecture, Corinthian, London, Map, My photo, Neoclassical, Regent's Park, Victorian | Leave a comment

The Nash Terraces line three of the four sides of Regent’s Park and are beautiful examples of neoclassical architecture in London. All the residences I have seen look like they are in tip-top condition. Very smart.

Postcard from a Nash Terrace!

Map of Regent’s Park

You can see the Baker Street tube sign at the lower edge of this map. After walking past the Sherlock Holmes Museum, on Upper Baker Street, you reach Clarence Gate. From that point, Nash Terraces stretch as far as the eye can see along Park Road to your left, and along York Terrace to your right towards Regent’s Park tube station, and then round the corner, along most of the west side of the park, up Albany Street. I think such places give you a good idea of the grandeur of London during the Victorian times. The first floor room of 221b Baker Street, from whose window Holmes would peer out through the smog, has been maintained in Victorian period style.

These elegant fluted columns are of the Corinthian order, the most ornate style in Classical architecture. On the map, this explanation is given for streets marked with number 1 in the column (under a simple Ionic capital symbol for classical architecture):

Nash Terraces
The neoclassical façades to the terraces which front three sides of the park were designed by John Nash, or with his approval (1819-28). The terraces have been much restored following the damage and dilapidation caused by World War II.

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