Taking global warming local

August 1, 2007 at 5:23 pm | Posted in Climate change, Framing science, Global warming, Local focus, Nebraska, US | Leave a comment

For our friends in the UK, who tend to despair that the federal government in America is dragging its heels (and slowing the whole world down) in terms of taking action to combat climate change—here is one of many good examples of action being taken in America at a local level to better inform citizens:

Global warming program is Saturday

Wednesday, August 1, 2007 9:38 AM CDT

Magazines and newspapers throughout the United States are discussing global warming and climate change. Many of these publications feature images of shrinking glaciers and polar bears stranded on chunks of ice. But will global warming affect the Midwest and Nebraska?

Homestead National Monument of America will host a 40-minute evening program entitled, “An Inconvenient Program: Global Warming and the Cornhusker State” at 7:30 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 4.

Alex Rose, a park ranger for Homestead National Monument, will present a slide show and discuss global warming and impacts to the earth, the United States and Nebraska. Following the program, Rose will host a Junior Ranger activity about climate change.

During the program, Rose will present research from a variety of sources, including the most recent report published by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, NASA and the National Center for Atmospheric Research.

To determine local impacts of climate change, Rose interviewed scientists and climatologists from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln.

“Global warming is a topic we should all learn more about,” said Mark Engler, superintendent of Homestead National Monument of America. “This program will take an issue of global significance and apply it to the local level.”

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